Common Women’s Sexual Issues

Common Mental Health Issues

Men’s Sexual Issues

Women’s Sexual Issues

Many women experience sexual problems in their lives. Some common women’s sexual problems, or issues, last for a little time, others women’s common sexual problems last longer in their duration. Women’s sexual problems like painful intercourse, either vaginismus or vulvadynia or dyspareunia, affect around a third of women. A woman’s sexuality can also be influenced by other factors like body image, grief, relationships, depression, and anxiety. People are provided with limited education about sex and sexuality and often the information is misrepresented or even incorrect.

The pages below provides information on some of the common women’s sexual problems or issues women may experience. Psychosexual therapy, or sex therapy can assist women and their partners to have en enjoyable sex life. Through sexual counselling, or sex therapy, you can explore the issues and develop tools to improve your sex lives.

You may find the information useful in your search for an answer. If you have any questions or would like to an appointment to discuss these issues contact Dr Christopher. Sex Life Therapy offers sex therapy and relationship therapy in Collingwood and Frankston. Skype-based sex therapy is available to people in other areas of Australia.

How Common are Common Women’s Sexual Problems?

  • 1 in 2 women reported a sexual problem in 2003
  • 1 in 2 women reported a lack of interest in sex as a sexual problem
  • 1 in 3 reported body image issues as a common sexual problem
  • 1 in 3 women were not able to achieve orgasm
  • 1 in 4 women reported sex as not pleasurable
  • 1 in 4 women reported vaginal dryness as a common sexual problem
  • 1 in 5 women reported sexual pain during intercourse
This is probably the most common sexual difficulty, particularly among women. Loss of desire can either be partial, or total. Partial loss of desire means that you have stopped initiating sexual contact with your partner, but will sometimes respond to their approaches. Click here to learn more.
Not all women want to or need to experience orgasm to enjoy love-making. However, there are also many women who rarely or never orgasm, and would like to, for whom sex therapy can be extremely helpful. Click here to learn more.
‘Vaginismus’ means you have persistent or recurrent difficulties in allowing your partner’s penis, a finger, or any object into your vagina – despite your expressed wish for penetration to happen. Click here to learn more.
Treatment for breast cancer can affect your sex life. A woman may experience less desire or interest in sex, during and following treatment. Some women after breast cancer no longer feel ‘desirable’ or ‘sexual’. Click here to learn more.
Many people only think about eating disorders and women when they think about body image. We all create images about our bodies. Click here to learn more.
Relationship can arise out of sexual issues, and sexual issues can result in relationship difficulties. Differences in desire, differences in choice of sexual activity can lead to issues in the relationship. Click here to learn more.
People who have survived sexual trauma sometimes experience sexual problems like an inability to reach orgasm, lack of interest in sex, vaginismus, fear of intimacy or touching. Click here to learn more.
Pornography and sex addictions are common issues. Not only do men form addictions to pornography and/or sex, some women do too. Click here to learn more.

A sexual phobia is a fear or anxiety of some kind that impacts your ability to become aroused. The phobia can be specific, for example, you will not touch your partner’s penis or vagina. Click here to learn more.
Self-esteem can impact on the way we think/feel about ourselves and others. Self-esteem can also impact on the way we interact with others, including sexually. Click here to learn more.
Bisexuality is often misunderstood by the general population. A person who is bisexual is NOT necessarily equally attracted to men and women. People who identify s bisexual are comfortable having relationships with either gender. Click here to learn more.
Sexual identity and sexual orientation are two terms that really mean the same thing. Many people think that there are three possible identities: heterosexual (straight); homosexual (gay or lesbian); and bi-sexual. People’s sexual identity is not necessarily that clear cut. Click here to learn more.
Sex therapy can help you work out how to manage the impact of health problems or acquired disability on your sexual relationship. You might worry about either hurting your partner or getting hurt after a major operation. Click here to learn more.
This is probably the most common sexual difficulty, particularly among women. Loss of desire can either be partial, or total. Partial loss of desire means that you have stopped initiating sexual contact with your partner, but will sometimes respond to their approaches. Click here to learn more.
Not all women want to or need to experience orgasm to enjoy love-making. However, there are also many women who rarely or never orgasm, and would like to, for whom sex therapy can be extremely helpful. Click here to learn more.
‘Vaginismus’ means you have persistent or recurrent difficulties in allowing your partner’s penis, a finger, or any object into your vagina – despite your expressed wish for penetration to happen. Click here to learn more.
Treatment for breast cancer can affect your sex life. A woman may experience less desire or interest in sex, during and following treatment. Some women after breast cancer no longer feel ‘desirable’ or ‘sexual’. Click here to learn more.
Many people only think about eating disorders and women when they think about body image. We all create images about our bodies. Click here to learn more.
Relationship can arise out of sexual issues, and sexual issues can result in relationship difficulties. Differences in desire, differences in choice of sexual activity can lead to issues in the relationship. Click here to learn more.
People who have survived sexual trauma sometimes experience sexual problems like an inability to reach orgasm, lack of interest in sex, vaginismus, fear of intimacy or touching. Click here to learn more.
Pornography and sex addictions are common issues. Not only do men form addictions to pornography and/or sex, some women do too. Click here to learn more.

A sexual phobia is a fear or anxiety of some kind that impacts your ability to become aroused. The phobia can be specific, for example, you will not touch your partner’s penis or vagina. Click here to learn more.
Self-esteem can impact on the way we think/feel about ourselves and others. Self-esteem can also impact on the way we interact with others, including sexually. Click here to learn more.
Bisexuality is often misunderstood by the general population. A person who is bisexual is NOT necessarily equally attracted to men and women. People who identify s bisexual are comfortable having relationships with either gender. Click here to learn more.
Sexual identity and sexual orientation are two terms that really mean the same thing. Many people think that there are three possible identities: heterosexual (straight); homosexual (gay or lesbian); and bi-sexual. People’s sexual identity is not necessarily that clear cut. Click here to learn more.
Sex therapy can help you work out how to manage the impact of health problems or acquired disability on your sexual relationship. You might worry about either hurting your partner or getting hurt after a major operation. Click here to learn more.
Want to Make a Booking or Have a Question?
Call at (03) 9005 5213 or fill out our booking and enquiry form and we’ll contact you

Experiencing difficulties in your sex life or relationship?

Speak to a professional.

Dr. Christopher Fox and the team at Sex Life Therapy provide confidential and individualised sex therapy and relationship therapy to individuals and couples at two locations: Collingwood and Frankston (Mornington Peninsula/Bayside).

Contact the team on (03) 9005 5213 or use the form to request a confidential chat.

OPENING HOURS

Mon: Fri 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM / Sat: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sun: Closed

COLLINGWOOD OFFICE LOCATION

Suite 209/134 Cambridge Street Collingwood Victoria 3066, Telephone (03) 9005 5213
VIEW MAP

FRANKSTON OFFICE LOCATION

Psyche’s Journey Suite 1/37 Mereweather Avenue FRANKSTON Victoria 3199
VIEW MAP